Cyber-Evil Getting Ever More Personal

Smartphones will soon become the target of choice for cyber attackers—making cyber warfare a personal matter. The emergence of mobile threats is nothing new, though until now, it has mainly been a phase of testing the waters and building an arms arsenal. Evil-doers are always on the lookout for weaknesses—the easiest to exploit and the most profitable. Now, it is mobile’s turn. We are witnessing a historic shift in focus from personal computers, the long-time classic target, to mobile devices. And of course, a lofty rationale lies behind this change.

Why Mobile?
The dramatic increase in usage of mobile apps concerning nearly every aspect of our lives, the explosive growth in mobile web browsing, and the monopoly that mobile has on personal communications makes our phones a worthy target. In retrospect, we can safely say that most security incidents are our fault: the more we interact with our computer, the higher the chances become that we will open a malicious document, visit a malicious website or mistakenly run a new application that runs havoc on our computer. Attackers have always favored human error, and what is better suited to expose these weaknesses than a computer that is so intimately attached to us 24 hours a day?

Mobile presents unique challenges for security. Software patching is broken where the rollout of security fixes for operating systems is anywhere from slow to non-existent on Android, and cumbersome on iOS. The dire Android fragmentation has been the Achilles heel for patching. Apps are not kept updated either where tens of thousands of micro-independent software vendors are behind many of the applications we use daily, security is the last concern on their mind. Another major headache rises from the blurred line between the business and private roles of the phone. A single tap on the screen takes you from your enterprise CRM app to your personal WhatsApp messages, to a health tracking application that contains a database of every vital sign you have shown since you bought your phone.

Emerging Mobile Threats
Mobile threats grow quickly in number and variety mainly because attackers are well-equipped and well-organized—this occurs at an alarming pace that is unparalleled to any previous emergence of cyber threats in other computing categories.

The first big wave of mobile threats to expect is cross-platform attacks, such as web browser exploits, cross-site scripting or ransomware—repurposing of field-proven attacks from the personal computer world onto mobile platforms. An area of innovation is in the methods of persistence employed by mobile attackers, as they will be highly difficult to detect, hiding deep inside applications and different parts of the operating systems. A new genre of mobile-only attacks target weaknesses in hybrid applications. Hybrid applications are called thus since they use the internal web browser engine as part of their architecture, and as a result, introduce many uncontrolled vulnerabilities. A large portion of the apps we are familiar with, including many banking-oriented ones and applications integrated into enterprise systems, were built this way. These provide an easy path for attackers into the back-end systems of many different organizations. The dreaded threat of botnets overflowing onto mobile phones is yet to materialize, though it will eventually happen as it did on all other pervasive computing devices. Wherever there are enough computing power and connectivity, bots appear sooner or later. With mobile, it will be major as the number of devices is high.

App stores continue to be the primary distribution channel for rogue software as it is almost impossible to identify automatically malicious apps, quite similar to the challenge of sandboxes that deal with evasive malware.

The security balance in the mobile world on the verge of disruption proving to us yet again, that ultimately we are at the mercy of the bad guys as far as cyber security goes. This is the case at least for the time being, as the mobile security industry is still in its infancy—playing a serious catch-up.

A variation of this story was published on Wired.co.UK – Hackers are honing in on your mobile phone.

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