The First Principle of Security By Design

People create technologies to serve a purpose. It starts with a goal in mind and then the creator is going through the design phase and later on builds a technology-based system that can achieve that goal. For example, someone created Google Docs which allows people to write documents online. A system is a composition of constructs and capabilities which can be used in a certain intended way. Designers always aspire for generalization in their creation so it can serve other potential uses to enjoy reuse of technologies and resources. This path which starts at the purpose and goes through design, construction, and usage, later on, is the primary paradigm of technological tools.

The challenge arises when technological creations are used for other purposes. Abused for unintended purposes. Every system has a theoretical spectrum of possible usages dictated by its capabilities, and it may be even impossible to grasp the full potential. The gap between potential vs. intended usages is the root of most if not all cybersecurity problems. The inherent risk in artificial intelligence lies within the same weakness of purpose vs. actual usage as well. Million of examples come to my mind, starting from computer viruses abusing standard operating system mechanisms to harm up to the recent abuse of Facebook’s advertising network to control the minds of US citizens during last elections. The pattern is not unique to technologies alone; it is a general attribute of tools while information technologies in their far reach elevated the risk of misuse.

One way to tackle this weakness is to add an additional phase into the design process which evaluates the boundaries of potential usages of each new system and devises a self-regulating framework. Each system will have its self-regulatory capability. An effort that should take place during the design phase but also evaluated continuously as the intersection of technologies create other potential uses. A first and basic principle in the emerging paradigm of security by design. Any protective measure that will be added post the design phase will incur higher implementation costs while its efficiency will be reduced. The later a self-regulating protection is applied, the higher the magnitude of reduction in its effectiveness.

Security in technologies should stop being an afterthought.

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